Dr. Frances Colpitt, art critic, corresponding editor to Art in America, and holder of the Deedie Potter Rose Chair of Art History at Texas Christian University, presents the problems of abstract painting in the postmodern/electronic age in her Tuesday Evenings lecture, Problems and Possibilities for Abstract Painting in Postmodernism.

 

Jayson Musson is an artist and writer living and working in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. For Tuesday Evenings, he shares his multifaceted body of work, which includes provocative performances, drawings, and writings, as well as Art Thoughtz by his “cousin” Hennessey Youngman.

Gretchen Diebenkorn Grant, daughter of Richard Diebenkorn, shares her insights and thoughts on the life and art of her father on the occasion of Richard Diebenkorn: The Ocean Park Series, the most comprehensive show to date of Diebenkorn’s celebrated works, the Ocean park paintings.

Alejandro Cesarco, born in Montevideo, Uruguay, is an artist living and working in New York. For Tuesday Evenings, he presents his work as seen in the Uruguay Pavilion at the 54thVenice Biennale, as well as his curatorial endeavors in Uruguay, the United States, and Argentina.

 

Sean Dockray, artist, writer, and founding director of Telic Arts Exchange in Los Angeles, California, has initiated critical and innovative projects, including The Public School and AAAARG.ORG. For Tuesday Evenings, he presents Exhibitability, a reflection on the sometimes destructive threshold he observed while running an art space as well as his own queries on alternatives to the exhibition model.

 

Dan Cameron is a renowned contemporary art curator known for his enthusiasm and activism, having founded and currently serving as the Artistic Director of U.S. Biennial, which organizes the Prospect New Orleans biennial and related exhibitions. Prospect 1 was a post Katrina effort that received critical acclaim and notoriety for its quality and outreach and Prospect 2 is scheduled for fall 2011. Among other positions, Cameron served for eleven years as Senior Curator of the New Museum in New York, was the Artistic Director for the 8th Istanbul Biennial and co-organizer of the 2006 Taipei Biennial, indicating the breadth and depth of his perspective and expectations of contemporary art. For Tuesday Evenings Cameron talks about how contemporary art can help restore a city's self-image following a major catastrophe, and in the case of a city as heavily dependent on tourism as New Orleans, provide an important economic boost through a cultural sector that has never been looked to in the past for economic development in his presentation Reclaiming a City through Art.

Simon Lee, a British artist living in Brooklyn, is known for his thoughtful presentations of light projection and the resulting narratives that grow from found imagery and common objects or occurrences in his stunning films, photographs, and performances. For Tuesday Evenings, Lee joins accomplished musician Algis Kizys for a screening of their recently produced Where is the Black Beast?, a spell-binding, episodic film based on CROW: The Life and Songs of the Crow, by poet Ted Hughe, as well as some of Lee’s other works and collaborations with Kizys. A 30-minute Q&A will follow the screenings and presentation, giving the audience an opportunity to inquire about the conceptual and practical processes that produced such compelling work.

Annie Cohen-Solal is the author of several books pertaining to culture and those who have played a role in forming it. Currently a professor at the French National Center for Scientific Research in Paris and Research Fellow at Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, Cohen-Solal came to New York as the Cultural Counselor to the French Embassy in the United States after her biography on the French existentialist Jean-Paul Sartre, Sartre: A Life, became an international best seller. An encounter with Leo Castelli prompted Cohen-Solal to shift her interest to the art world, resulting in Leo Castelli et Les Siens  (Gallimard, Paris), a critically acclaimed book that went on to win the Artcurial Prize for contemporary books. The American version, Leo and His Circle was published in May 2010. The “acknowledged dean of contemporary art dealers,” as Castelli has been termed, and the author’s experiences that led to Leo & His Circle are the subject of this Tuesday Evening presentation.

Mary Ellen Carroll is a conceptual artist living and working in New York City and Houston, Texas, whose career, spanning more than 20 years, has focused on a single, fundamental question: What do we consider a work of art? The results are multifarious, provocative, and often wry outpourings in architecture, writing, performance, photography, filmmaking, printmaking, sculpture, and painting that interrogate the relationship between subjectivity, language, and power. Carroll teaches architecture at Rice University in Houston, where she has manifested what she terms her opus, prototype 180, a 10-year project that involves the revolution of a single-family home on its foundation, conceived as a way of making architecture perform. Carroll has received much recognition for her daring and compelling work, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Rockefeller Fellowship, a Pollack/Krasner Award, and most recently, the Artistic Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects in Houston. For Tuesday Evenings, Mary Ellen Carroll presents Architecture is Not Art.

Kristen Morgin is an artist based in Los Angeles who is known for her incredible feats with fired and unfired clay in creating sculptures that conjure the past as they seemingly mimic a variety of enchanting, though a little worse-for-wear, memorabilia. L. A. Times art critic Christopher Knight comments, “Melancholy does not merely waft into the atmosphere from Kristen Morgin's elaborately crafted clay, wire, and wood sculptures. It pours forth in torrents, filling the gallery with sadness that it is palpable and almost unbearable.” Such responses have won Morgin inclusion in exhibitions such as the New Museum’s inaugural Unmonumental and Thing, an exhibition of the most innovative contemporary sculpture by 20 of Los Angeles’s up and coming young artists. For Tuesday Evenings, Morgin shares the thoughts and processes that guide her work.

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