Marlon Blackwell, FAIA, practices architecture in Fayetteville, Arkansas and serves as Distinguished Professor and Department Chair in the School of Architecture at the University of Arkansas. Recognized throughout his career with honors and awards, Blackwell received a 2012 AIA National Honor Award and the 2012 Architecture Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters for a unique use of design strategies that draw upon vernaculars and contradictions of place to transgress conventional boundaries for architecture. Blackwell is here as the lead juror for the Fort Worth AIA annual Design Awards and to present Figures and Types for this Tuesday Evenings lecture.

 

Martin Gayford, the British critic, writer, and curator, is "the man in a blue scarf." As a prominent sitter for Freud and the subject of the painting Man in a Blue Scarf, 2004, Gayford wrote of his experience in the 2010 book Man with a Blue Scarf: On Sitting for a Portrait by Lucian Freud. For Tuesday Evenings at the Modern, Gayford shares what he observed throughout his extended sittings and the relationship that he inevitably developed with the artist. 

Rosson Crow lives and works in Los Angeles, California. She was raised in North Dallas, attended the School of Visual Arts in New York for her undergraduate degree, then Yale University for her master's degree before settling in L.A. In 2009, Crow had her first solo exhibition in the United States here at the Modern, titled Focus: Rosson Crow, from which the museum acquired Sharp's Rifle Shop, 2009. First attracting attention as a graduate student at Yale making large-scale, edgy, irreverent, and raucous paintings, Crow has built a substantial international exhibition record including her 2009 exhibition Texas Crude at White Cube in London and, most recently, Ballyhoo Hullabaloo-Haboob at Honor Fraser in Los Angeles. For Tuesday Evenings, Rosson Crow shares thoughts on her work and career.

An internationally recognized photographer, Nicholas Nixon has helped shape the dialogue of photographic discourse for over four decades. His work gained broad attention when it was included in one of the most influential exhibitions of the 1970s, New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-Altered Landscape at the George Eastman House in 1975. His first solo museum exhibition in 1976 was curated by John Szarkowski at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

 

Nixon has explored a vast range of subject matter, including the changing urban landscape in and around Boston, as well as portraits of people who live there. His camera has captured intimate portraits of people in nursing homes, the blind, sick, and dying. He has also included his family in this revealing visual biography of people who have inspired him.

 

In 1975, Nixon began one of his most famous ongoing projects entitled The Brown Sisters, Truro, Massachusetts. The series consists of an annual portrait of his wife and her three sisters, consistently posed in the same left-to-right order. To date there are 38 portraits in all, tracking time through the faces of his family. The entire series of this critically acclaimed project is in the collection of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. Nixon will discuss the development of this and other photographic projects with the Museum's Chief Curator, Michael Auping.

David Dawson, painter and longtime assistant and friend of Lucian Freud, shares personal insights and thoughts on his 20-year relationship with the brilliant and driven artist for this Tuesday Evenings at the Modern. Photographing Freud and his studio over the years, Dawson explained to the Guardian that his photographic documentation was an “honest record” of their relationship, commenting that working with Freud was “never a burden, but certainly a commitment.”

In conjunction with Glenn Ligon: America, a distinguished panel of scholars from various fields and art disciplines will discuss ideas presented in José Esteban Muñoz's 1996 book Disidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics, described by the University of Minnesota Press as "an important perspective on the ways outsiders negotiate mainstream culture." As a member of the panel, Mr. Muñoz will share his personal insights and ideas along with fellow panelists: moderator, Noah Simblist, an artist, Southern Methodist University professor of Art who recently co-curated Queer States at the Visual Arts Center at the University of Texas, Austin; Annette Lawrence, an internationally recognized artist based in North Texas and assistant professor of painting and drawing at University of North Texas; Roberto Tejada, a poet, critic, curator, editor, and Southern Methodist University's Distinguished Endowed Chair of Art History; and Rose Pulliam of Allgo, a Texas support organization for queer people of color based in Austin. Join us for this unique opportunity on May 1, 2012, 7 to 8:30 pm in the Modern's auditorium. This program is free and open to the public, but tickets should be picked up at the information desk to assure seating.

 

Lucy Lippard is a distinguished writer, curator, editor, lecturer, and activist who has long been appreciated for her expansive scholarship and insight, having been one of the first to recognize the dematerialization of the work in art’s movement toward conceptualism as well as an early champion of feminist art. The author of 21 books, curator of 50 exhibitions, cofounder of Printed Matter Inc., the Heresies Collective, Political Art Documentation/Distribution, Artists Call Against U.S. Intervention in Central America, and other artists’ organizations, Lippard has received eight honorary doctorates in fine arts as well as numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Frank Jewett Mather Award for Criticism, two National Endowment for the Arts grants in criticism, the Women’s  Caucus for Art (WCA) Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Bard College Award for Curatorial Excellence. Of Lippard’s book, The Lure of the Local: Senses of Place in a Multicentered Society, Thomas Hine wrote for the New York Times Book Review, “Lippard overwhelms us with the breadth of her reading and the comprehensiveness with which she considers the things that define place. . . . In its final section, The Lure of the Local is revealed as a sort of art book after all. Its intent is to explore the many things that those who make art or who make judgments about art should think about when they consider art that seeks to be ‘contextual,’ ‘site-specific,’ or ‘place making’.” Lippard’s most recent book is Down Country: The Tano of the Galisteo Basin 1250–1782, for which she received the Caroline Bancroft History Prize from the Denver Public Library.

For Tuesday Evenings, Lippard presents Undermining, touching on photography, the new West, development, water, and land art, as she discusses pits and erections (gravel pits and skyscrapers), and more.

Gary Rough is a Scottish conceptual artist based in New York who represented his homeland in the 2003 Venice Biennale. As described in the press release for a recent solo show at numberthirtyfive gallery, New York, Rough “has cast himself as the antihero in his own dystopian novel.” Rough scrupulously labors to report upon the fragility, pathos, and beauty of the human condition, evoking the romantic, mundane, bleak, and intimate in paintings, sculpture, text, T-shirts, site-specific installations, and more with work that appears to be cobbled together in a deceptively hurried and craftless manner. It is no surprise that Rough was attracted to Kurt Vonnegut’s character Rabo Karabekian, the fictional and failed Abstract Expressionist painter whose paintings faded and disappeared from their canvases in Bluebeard due to a combination of stupidity and bad luck. After working with the author, in 2007, the year of Vonnegut’s death, Rough recreated and showed Karabekian’s “Sateen-Dura Luxe” paintings, at Fergus McCaffrey Fine Art, New York, based on Vonnegut’s descriptions of them in the book. This exercise, and the remarkable resulting paintings, brought Rough critical acclaim and an intriguing relationship with Vonnegut and his widow. Rough continues to explore the ordinary and often pathetic experiences and conditions of life on earth with tenderness and extraordinary astuteness. For Tuesday Evenings, he shares the insights and revelations of his career thus far.

Andrea Fraser is an artist currently based in Los Angeles, California, where she is a professor at UCLA in the department of art. She also serves as visiting faculty for the Whitney Independent Study Program in New York. Fraser has used performance, video, and a range of other media to explore the motivations that drive artists, collectors, art dealers, corporate sponsors, museum trustees, and museum visitors from the pursuit of prestige to that of financial investment, to sexual fantasy and self-realization. Working since the mid-1980s, Fraser has built on the site-specific and research-based approaches that emerged with conceptualism, combining them with feminist investigations of subjectivity and desire. Her methods are rooted in the psychoanalytic principle that one can only engage structures and relationships through the immediacy of performance. In addition, Fraser also writes about her observations and experiences in art and life. Moved by a personal and immediate engagement with Fred Sandback’s work at Dia: Beacon in 2004, she wrote the essay, “Why does Fred Sandback’s Work Make Me Cry.” For Tuesday Evenings, Fraser presents and discusses this moving essay that explores the psychological and emotional aspects of our relationship with art and museums.

Brooklyn-based artist Byron Kim is known for his monochrome paintings, born out of representation, that seemingly challenge their relationship to abstraction. Faye Hirsch describes his work in an interview with the artist for Art in America, “You see subtle variations of color within the fields. Recalling paintings by midcentury modernists like Rothko and Reinhardt, they feel like pure abstraction, but as always with Kim, have profound ties to the world.” Recognized in the early 1990s for Synecdoche, a grouping of hundreds of small monochrome paintings based on skin tones that was included in the 1993 Whitney Biennial, Kim collaborated that same year with friend and fellow artist Glenn Ligon on the painting Black and White, which exploits the notion of “flesh tone” as a color. Kim has since moved to meditations on the sky with his ongoing Sunday Paintings (a series begun in 2001). These small and stunning presentations of the daytime sky are immediately personal, with notations from mundane to profound, that mark the moment they represent written across their surfaces while at the same time thoughtfully reference the historical Today Series by On Kawara. Kim’s devotion to his paintings and their subjects has brought him critical acclaim; he has received numerous awards, including the Alpert Award in the Arts, UCROSS, and the Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant. His work has been the subject of numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout the United States and abroad, including Korea, Poland, Spain, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Canada.

For Tuesday Evenings, Kim presents the ideas and experiences that have formed his work.

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