Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Annie Cohen-Solal is the author of several books pertaining to culture and those who have played a role in forming it. Currently a professor at the French National Center for Scientific Research in Paris and Research Fellow at Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, Cohen-Solal came to New York as the Cultural Counselor to the French Embassy in the United States after her biography on the French existentialist Jean-Paul Sartre, Sartre: A Life, became an international best seller. An encounter with Leo Castelli prompted Cohen-Solal to shift her interest to the art world, resulting in Leo Castelli et Les Siens  (Gallimard, Paris), a critically acclaimed book that went on to win the Artcurial Prize for contemporary books. The American version, Leo and His Circle was published in May 2010. The “acknowledged dean of contemporary art dealers,” as Castelli has been termed, and the author’s experiences that led to Leo & His Circle are the subject of this Tuesday Evening presentation.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Mary Ellen Carroll is a conceptual artist living and working in New York City and Houston, Texas, whose career, spanning more than 20 years, has focused on a single, fundamental question: What do we consider a work of art? The results are multifarious, provocative, and often wry outpourings in architecture, writing, performance, photography, filmmaking, printmaking, sculpture, and painting that interrogate the relationship between subjectivity, language, and power. Carroll teaches architecture at Rice University in Houston, where she has manifested what she terms her opus, prototype 180, a 10-year project that involves the revolution of a single-family home on its foundation, conceived as a way of making architecture perform. Carroll has received much recognition for her daring and compelling work, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Rockefeller Fellowship, a Pollack/Krasner Award, and most recently, the Artistic Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects in Houston. For Tuesday Evenings, Mary Ellen Carroll presents Architecture is Not Art.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Kristen Morgin is an artist based in Los Angeles who is known for her incredible feats with fired and unfired clay in creating sculptures that conjure the past as they seemingly mimic a variety of enchanting, though a little worse-for-wear, memorabilia. L. A. Times art critic Christopher Knight comments, “Melancholy does not merely waft into the atmosphere from Kristen Morgin's elaborately crafted clay, wire, and wood sculptures. It pours forth in torrents, filling the gallery with sadness that it is palpable and almost unbearable.” Such responses have won Morgin inclusion in exhibitions such as the New Museum’s inaugural Unmonumental and Thing, an exhibition of the most innovative contemporary sculpture by 20 of Los Angeles’s up and coming young artists. For Tuesday Evenings, Morgin shares the thoughts and processes that guide her work.

Sterling Allen is an artist and cofounder of Okay Mountain gallery in Austin, Texas, whose own work is known for its humor and profundity. Allen has been recognized for his consumer conscious, found object-based drawings, sculptures, and installations.  Awarded national and international residencies, Allen has been featured in numerous exhibitions, including the 2010 International Artists in Residence in Argentina, Buenos Aires; the 2009 Artpace International Artist- In-Residence Program; and Nexus Texas, a 2007 group exhibition of 16 artists working in Texas at the Contemporary Arts Museum in Houston. This Tuesday Evenings presentation offers insight into Allen’s practice as an artist while serving as a preview to the reinstallation of the Artpace exhibition Housing Edition, which opens March 5 and runs through April 24, 2011 at the Fort Worth Contemporary Art Gallery at Texas Christian University.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Dallas-based architect Brent Brown, AIA, has focused his efforts on bringing “design thinking” to all communities. The founding director of the building community WORKSHOP (bcWORKSHOP), Brown has received a great deal of recognition for his socially conscious design concepts, including the 2007, 2008, and 2010 Awards for Excellence in Community Design and Sustainable Design by AIA/Dallas and most recently, the 2010 National AIA/HUD Secretary Award for Community-Informed Design by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in conjunction with the American Institute for Architects for his Congo Street Green Initiative. In addition, Brown was named the Founding Director of Dallas City Design Studio and represented the Southwest region as part of the President's forum on Clean Energy and Public Health at the White House. For Tuesday Evenings, Brown presents Design Justice, discussing the responsibilities and opportunities for socially conscious architecture as illustrated in his own practice.

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