Dr. Beatriz Rodríguez Balanta received her PhD in Romance Studies from Duke University, where she focused on the visual and literary mechanisms used to refurbish racial and social hierarchies in Brazil and Colombia in the aftermath of the abolition of slavery for her dissertation Realism, Race and Citizenship: Four Moments in the Making of the Black Body, Colombia and Brazil, 1853-1907. Having recently arrived in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex as Assistant Professor of Art History at Southern Methodist University, Dr. Balanta offers interesting insights into the work of Yinka Shonibare MBE, currently featured in the Modern's exhibition FOCUS: Yinka Shonibare MBE, for this Tuesday Evenings presentation titled "'Paradox, Excess and Complicity:' Yinka Shonibare and the Conceptualization of (Post?) Colonial Experience."

Gary Simmons, a New York-based artist recognized for his forthright address of race and culture, is probably best known for his expansive erasure drawings, originally made in chalk on blackboards that he smeared and obscured by hand to create ghostly images. One such piece, Wall of Eyes, was commissioned for the 1993 Whitney Biennial, and, more recently, the artist received critical attention for his solo exhibition Black Marquee at Anthony Meier Fine Arts, San Francisco, that referenced "blaxploitation" films of the 1970s. With an impressive exhibition record and a full-scale monograph, Gary Simmons:Paradise, Simmons is one of the Modern's 2013 FOCUS show artists. FOCUS: Gary Simmons is on view through March 14, and for this Tuesday Evenings talk, the artist presents recurring ideas and new developments in his work.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. Artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. Artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Jenny Holzer is internationally recognized for her daring approach to Public Art and her dramatic site-specific installations in galleries and museums. Since the mid-1970s, Holzer has used language as her primary means of expression, delivering various statements and stories through a wide range of media. Beginning with inexpensively printed posters, Holzer's art has steadily evolved in sophistication, expanding into a lexicon that includes advertising billboards, radio, television, clothing, and the medium she is most associated with-the electronic sign. Many will be familiar with Holzer's well-known Truisms: PROTECT ME FROM WHAT I WANT, MONEY CREATES TASTE, YOUR OLDEST FEARS ARE YOUR WORST ONES, LACK OF CHARISMA CAN BE FATAL.

In December, the Museum will unveil a major new installation by Holzer that will include long channels of lighted text running through the central, clerestory gallery looking out onto the pond. The artist will talk about this new installation, as well as how her work has developed over her distinguished career.

 


Howard Rachofsky is an internationally renowned collector of contemporary art living in Dallas. He began collecting in the mid-1970s, and over the past three decades has amassed a world-class collection of paintings, sculpture, video, and installation art by many of the era's greatest artists, including Robert Irwin, Donald Judd, Anselm Kiefer, Jeff Koons, Bruce Nauman, Gerhard Richter, and Mark Rothko, among many others.

In 1996, Rachofsky opened a spacious, modernist house designed by renowned architect Richard Meier. This house, which the collector has opened to the public and for school tours, has been the focus for installing different aspects of the collection in unique ways. This fall, he will open another space (17,000 square feet) in Dallas for even larger and more ambitious installations. Rachofsky will talk about his collecting philosophy and his future plans for the collection.

 

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. Artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Marlon Blackwell, FAIA, practices architecture in Fayetteville, Arkansas and serves as Distinguished Professor and Department Chair in the School of Architecture at the University of Arkansas. Recognized throughout his career with honors and awards, Blackwell received a 2012 AIA National Honor Award and the 2012 Architecture Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters for a unique use of design strategies that draw upon vernaculars and contradictions of place to transgress conventional boundaries for architecture. Blackwell is here as the lead juror for the Fort Worth AIA annual Design Awards and to present Figures and Types for this Tuesday Evenings lecture.

 

Martin Gayford, the British critic, writer, and curator, is "the man in a blue scarf." As a prominent sitter for Freud and the subject of the painting Man in a Blue Scarf, 2004, Gayford wrote of his experience in the 2010 book Man with a Blue Scarf: On Sitting for a Portrait by Lucian Freud. For Tuesday Evenings at the Modern, Gayford shares what he observed throughout his extended sittings and the relationship that he inevitably developed with the artist. 

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. Artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

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