Matthew Collings, the British artist and writer, has been recognized throughout a diverse and emphatic career for his wit and brilliant perspective on art and the culture that surrounds it. As the editor of Artscribe, a timely publication that regularly featured contributions by Art & Language; the creator, writer, and host of a number of TV documentaries, including the six-part series This Is Modern Art, which won many awards, including a BAFTA; and an author of books about contemporary art in London that combine informed description with "seeing the black heart in everything," Collings has received notable recognition, including a special commendation from the Turner Prize committee. His exhibition Matthew Collings and Emma Biggs: Suspicious Utopia opens March 23 at Fort Worth Contemporary Arts.

For this Tuesday Evenings presentation, Collings promises an evening of aesthetic intensity and lurid biography as he shares the peculiar life experiences that fed into his optimistic abstract paintings about light that he makes in collaboration with mosaicist Emma Biggs. The paintings stand in stark contrast to the acute and uncompromising look he takes as a writer and commentator, while nevertheless being made with the conviction that, as stated on Collings's website, "Art, as it used to be understood, has come to an end."

Richard Phillips is a New York-based artist known for his strikingly distinctive paintings, such as the early Girl Child, 1996-97in the Modern's permanent collection. Using found imagery, Phillips's work addresses the marketability of man and his wishes, ideas, actions, identity, sexuality, politics, and desires. He translates these images into both drawings and paintings, and, in doing so, he makes use of the iconic quality of pictures, which the media and art use daily-each according to its own agenda. Recently, Phillips has begun to explore filmmaking and photography as means of moving beyond found imagery in his paintings. He completed his first film, Lindsay Lohan, in 2011. The film premiered at the 2011 Venice Biennale in tandem with his second film, Sasha Grey. His third film premiered at Art Basel's Art Unlimited exhibition in Basel, Switzerland, in June 2012. All three films were shown for the first time in the United States alongside a group of corresponding paintings at Gagosian Gallery in New York in September 2012. 

For this Tuesday Evenings presentation, "Painting Beyond Reason," Phillips addresses a selection of works spanning his career, with an emphasis on his most recent shows at White Cube in London and Gagosian Gallery in New York and three short films.

Andrew Solomon is the author of the novel A Stone Boat and The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression, winner of fourteen national awards, including the 2001 National Book Award, a Pulitzer Prize finalist, and a New York Times bestseller, now published in twenty-two languages. For this special evening at the Modern, Solomon presents his most recent publication, Far From the Tree. Culled from ten years of research and 40,000 pages of interview transcripts from conversations with more than 300 families across America, Far From the Tree examines extreme versions of the profound difference that all parents and children feel from one another. In twelve astonishingly acute and compassionate chapters, Solomon tells stories of children who have been heartbreakingly tragic victims of intense prejudices-but also stories of parents who have embraced their children's differences and tried to alter the world's understanding of their conditions. Far From the Tree has been described as "a masterpiece that will rattle our prejudices, question our policies, and inspire our understanding of the relationship between illness and identity. Above all, it will renew and deepen our gratitude for the herculean reach of parental love."

 

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. Artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.


Dr. Mark Thistlethwaite, the Kay and Velma Kimbell Chair of Art History at Texas Christian University, is recognized for his scholarship in nineteenth-century to contemporary American art. He has been a valued participant in the Dallas/Fort Worth art community since his arrival more than three decades ago. Throughout the years, Dr. Thistlethwaite has actively engaged with the Modern by leading programs and demonstrating how the museum can be an educational resource by creating numerous university classes based on exhibitions and taught in the Museum's galleries. He has served on the Board of Trustees of the Modern since 1983, and he co-authored the museum's collection catalogue, 110, with the Modern's curators Michael Auping and Andrea Karnes. 


To commemorate Tuesday Evenings at the Modern's tenth year in the Tadao Ando building, Dr. Thistlethwaite, who gave the first Tuesday Evenings lecture in 1979 on the work of Jackie Winsor, shares insights and stories as he presents his experiences and knowledge gained through a longstanding relationship with the Modern.


Dr. Beatriz Rodríguez Balanta received her PhD in Romance Studies from Duke University, where she focused on the visual and literary mechanisms used to refurbish racial and social hierarchies in Brazil and Colombia in the aftermath of the abolition of slavery for her dissertation Realism, Race and Citizenship: Four Moments in the Making of the Black Body, Colombia and Brazil, 1853-1907. Having recently arrived in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex as Assistant Professor of Art History at Southern Methodist University, Dr. Balanta offers interesting insights into the work of Yinka Shonibare MBE, currently featured in the Modern's exhibition FOCUS: Yinka Shonibare MBE, for this Tuesday Evenings presentation titled "'Paradox, Excess and Complicity:' Yinka Shonibare and the Conceptualization of (Post?) Colonial Experience."

Gary Simmons, a New York-based artist recognized for his forthright address of race and culture, is probably best known for his expansive erasure drawings, originally made in chalk on blackboards that he smeared and obscured by hand to create ghostly images. One such piece, Wall of Eyes, was commissioned for the 1993 Whitney Biennial, and, more recently, the artist received critical attention for his solo exhibition Black Marquee at Anthony Meier Fine Arts, San Francisco, that referenced "blaxploitation" films of the 1970s. With an impressive exhibition record and a full-scale monograph, Gary Simmons:Paradise, Simmons is one of the Modern's 2013 FOCUS show artists. FOCUS: Gary Simmons is on view through March 14, and for this Tuesday Evenings talk, the artist presents recurring ideas and new developments in his work.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. Artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. Artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Jenny Holzer is internationally recognized for her daring approach to Public Art and her dramatic site-specific installations in galleries and museums. Since the mid-1970s, Holzer has used language as her primary means of expression, delivering various statements and stories through a wide range of media. Beginning with inexpensively printed posters, Holzer's art has steadily evolved in sophistication, expanding into a lexicon that includes advertising billboards, radio, television, clothing, and the medium she is most associated with-the electronic sign. Many will be familiar with Holzer's well-known Truisms: PROTECT ME FROM WHAT I WANT, MONEY CREATES TASTE, YOUR OLDEST FEARS ARE YOUR WORST ONES, LACK OF CHARISMA CAN BE FATAL.

In December, the Museum will unveil a major new installation by Holzer that will include long channels of lighted text running through the central, clerestory gallery looking out onto the pond. The artist will talk about this new installation, as well as how her work has developed over her distinguished career.

 

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