Amy Blakemore has been described as an artist who “takes photographs in order to explore the ways in which memory both records and transforms visual information.” (Amy Blakemore: Photographs 1988–2008, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston) Blakemore, trained in the documentary tradition, is known for her small-scale photographs that suggest random snapshots while evoking something personal and poetic, something that puzzles and lingers. For Tuesday Evenings, she presents the unassuming and unforgettable photographs for which she has received much deserved recognition and critical acclaim.

Each Sunday throughout the run of Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, accomplished artist living and working in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex offer unique thoughts on the artist, his work, and his contributions as they put this special exhibition into context based on their own particular perspectives as artists.

Liam Gillick is an artist living and working in London and New York, and a lecturer at Columbia University, New York, as well as a writer and theorist. Gillick’s sculptures, installations, public projects, film scores, theoretical writing, design objects, and videos often center on social, economic, and political systems, and society's relationships and reactions to such structures. He has exhibited extensively worldwide, is closely associated with the relational aesthetics models of community, and was the artist presented at the German Pavilion during the 2009 Venice Biennale curated by Nicolaus Schafhausen. The selection of Gillick for the German Pavillion was carefully considered. Of his choice, Schafhausen wrote, “For me, as the curator it is important that Gillick understand art as a medium through which to observe contemporary life in its transformations and aporiae...” Gillick’s Tuesday Evenings presentation offers insight into his ideas and his diverse body of work that has contributed greatly to the discourse of the larger art world while encouraging intimate conversation and application among individual viewers, readers, and participants.

Each Sunday throughout the run of Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, accomplished artist living and working in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex offer unique thoughts on the artist, his work, and his contributions as they put this special exhibition into context based on their own particular perspectives as artists.

John Smith is a British filmmaker living and working in London, where he also teaches part-time as Professor of Fine Art at the University of London. Smith has received notoriety and praise for films that are strongly influenced by the Structural Materialist ideas that dominated British filmmaking during his formative years. Also fascinated by the immersive power of narrative and the spoken word, Smith has developed a body of work that deftly subverts the boundaries between documentary and fiction, representation and abstraction. Drawing on the raw material of everyday life, these meticulously crafted films rework and transform reality, playfully exploring and exposing the language of cinema. Described by Mark O’Pray of Art Monthly as, “One of the most talented filmmakers of the postwar generation,” Smith presents Real Fiction, a selection of his short films and presentation on the ideas that have shaped his art over the past four decades.

Each Sunday throughout the run of Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, accomplished artist living and working in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex offer unique thoughts on the artist, his work, and his contributions as they put this special exhibition into context based on their own particular perspectives as artists.

Peruvian-born artist Gabriel Acevedo Velarde recently embarked on a gradual move from Lima, Peru, to Mexico City to São Paolo, Brazil, and then to New York and Berlin. He uses experiences from his travels to inform his multimedia installations as featured in the Modern’s second FOCUS exhibition of 2010. Acevedo Velarde organizes his diverse artistic practice into projects that differ dramatically in terms of materials, technique, and presentation, but share an astute portrayal of the human condition, looking at the psychology of self-preservation within the precarious fragility of community and civilization. The artist touches on the driving force in his work with a description of one particular project, “The subject is a system that tries to keep standing despite its inner chaos, decadence, and most of all, its wild will for change.” For Tuesday Evenings, Acevedo Velarde discusses his methodology and the resulting performances, installations, films, and drawings that have been acknowledged for their elaborate preparation of seemingly simple forms that offer both humor and horror.

Each Sunday throughout the run of Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, accomplished artist living and working in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex offer unique thoughts on the artist, his work, and his contributions as they put this special exhibition into context based on their own particular perspectives as artists.

Joseph D. Ketner II is currently the Henry and Lois Foster Chair in Contemporary Art, Distinguished Curator-in-Residence, at Emerson College, a position that follows his post as the chief curator at the Milwaukee Art Museum where he organized Andy Warhol the Last Decade. As a preview to the exhibition's opening on February 14, Ketner shares insight and expertise on the subject in his presentation Who is Andy Warhol. He explains that, “Warhol is as misunderstood as he is famous. Over the course of his nearly 40-year career the mercurial, paradoxical artist transformed art and celebrity. Yet, it is interesting that his reputation is founded on only his six-year Pop art phase. Remarkably, the final decade of his career may have been his most productive.” For Tuesday Evenings, Ketner examines some of the little known aspects of Warhol’s personality that are revealed in his seldom seen last paintings.

Tony Scherman is a Canadian artist renowned for his encaustic paintings found in collections throughout North America and Europe. Erudite and passionate, Scherman brings a wealth of research and a tremendous facility for painting to his melancholic portraits that press hard into the space of the viewer. As Lilly Wei explains in the exhibition catalogue About 1865, “Scherman has an impulse to destabilize precedents, to seek transformations and to view ideologies with skepticism, to be conceptually vigilant. It is also evident that his point of view is compassionate and, perhaps most significantly, that he makes memorable paintings.” For Tuesday Evenings, Scherman concentrates on the past five years of his career.

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