Gardar Eide Einarsson is the artist featured in the Modern’s first FOCUS exhibition of the 2009–2010 season, which opens December 13. This Tuesday Evening presentation offers insight into work described in the 2008 Whitney Biennial exhibition catalogue as, “Investigations into various forms of social transgression and arguments for political subversion.” Einarsson’s text-based works, coupled with graphics from various subcultures and other installation elements, evoke cerebral and visceral readings based on complex associations and what the artist calls a “new take on Minimalism,” in which he investigates the viewer’s physical relationship with the art.

Stephen Lapthisophon is an artist and educator living and working in Dallas. A student of art history, comparative literature and theory, poetry, film and the sensory world, Lapthisophon’s work varies in form from found objects to images, installations, performances, and sound. His work has been described as “layers of meanings, allusions, and associations.” (Kathryn Hixson, Frieze) For Tuesday Evenings, Lapthisophon presents his work as it confronts and demonstrates means of communication through art. 

Wayne White is a Los Angeles-based artist. Having begun his career as a production designer for Pee-Wee’s Playhouse, White is now recognized for his clever and beautifully rendered text paintings. As a wordsmith and draftsman extraordinaire, White juxtaposes irreverent and humorous phrases with the pastoral scenes of existing thrift-store paintings to create something all together new and always compelling. Tuesday Evenings focuses on the work featured in the recently published monograph, Maybe Now I’ll Get The Respect I So Richly Deserve, which is a comprehensive view of White’s 30-plus-year career.

Museum docents speak on the artwork of Donald Judd and Martin Puryear.

Museum docents speak about the influence of the West on certain works in the Permanent Collection.

Rosson Crow is an artist living and working in Los Angeles. Crow’s large-scale, raucous paintings have been described as “inspired by diverse references—Baroque and Rococo interior design, cowboy culture, Las Vegas architecture, theatre, and music—their dominant scale pulling the viewer into the psychological space of the spectacle. These paintings oscillate between celebration and desolation.” This Tuesday Evenings presentation serves to set up the Modern’s FOCUS: Rosson Crow, which opens the following weekend.

March 24, 2009

Donald Sultan is one of the leading American contemporary still life artists, known for his large–scale, “catastrophic-event” paintings that incorporate nontraditional materials such as Dead Plant, November 1, 1988, as well as his sensuous charcoal drawings of iconic presentations and abstract depictions of fruit such as Black Lemons, May 20, 1985, both in the Modern’s collection. For this Tuesday Evenings presentation, Sultan shares details of his 30-year career as found in the recently published monograph, Donald Sultan: The Theater of the Object.

Fahamu Pecou is an artist working in Atlanta, where he began a branding campaign for his own career as a painter. Fahamu Pecou is the Shit (which began in 2002 with paintings of the artist on the cover of art and culture magazines, t-shirts, posters, a mockumentary, and guerilla street art) is fashioned after similar celebrity campaigns Pecou created for various rap and hip-hop artists through his design business, Diamond Lounge. This Tuesday Evenings presentation, Behind the Canvas, takes an intimate look at the personal life of an artist.         

Nicola Vassell is a curator, art writer, and currently a director of Deitch Projects in New York. For this Tuesday Evenings lecture, Vassell presents DARK ART: A New Conversation with Abstraction, in which she proposes that “a new and grittier form of abstraction permits us to theorize that a younger generation of painters, consciously or not, is producing ruggedly electric paintings that tell somber and vicious tales . . . making a statement on the sociopolitical inevitability of a world gone mad.”

Gavin Morrison is curator of Fort Worth Contemporary Arts at Texas Christian University and a director of the curatorial initiative, Atopia Projects. For this Tuesday Evenings presentation, Cowboys on the Lido, Morrison considers a hypothetical Texas pavilion at the 54th Venice Biennial in 2011 (also the 175th anniversary of the founding of the Republic of Texas), asking, “What would it mean for Texas to be presented in this context and at a time where nation-states and cultural identity are often subject to continual negotiation?”

 

 

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