“As ephemeral as our footprints were in the sand along the river, so also were those moments of childhood caught in the photographs. And so will be our family itself, our marriage, the children who enriched it, and the love that has carried us through so much. All this will be gone. What we hope will remain are these pictures telling our brief story, but what will last, beyond all of it, is the place.” — Sally Mann, Hold Still: A Memoir with Photographs

A Special Lecture by Sally Mann

Sally Mann, one of America’s most renowned photographers, recently released her much-anticipated memoir Hold Still (Little, Brown and Company) to high acclaim. Patricia Wall of the New York Times compares Mann with none other than Walker Evans, stating, “I held Evans’s writing in mind while reading Hold Still, the photographer Sally Mann’s weird, intense and uncommonly beautiful new memoir. Ms. Mann has got Evans’s gift for fine and offbeat declaration.” Wall closes her review with, “The best quality of Hold Still — a book that strikes me as an instant classic among Southern memoirs of the last 50 years — is its ambient sense of an original, come-as-you-are life that has been well lived and well observed. It’s a book that dials open the aperture on your own senses. Like the photographs she most admires, it is rooted in particulars yet has ‘some rudiment of the eternal in it.’”

For this special presentation, artist Sally Mann reads from Hold Still: A Memoir with Photographs.

A video recording of this lectures will be available on the Modern's Youtube

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on special exhibitions, with artists, curators, art historians, and writers holding conversations in the galleries. This special program is free and begins at 1 pm on the first Sunday of selected months.

 lauren woods is a Dallas-based conceptual artist whose hybrid media projects — film, video and sound installations, public interventions, and site-specific work — engage history as a lens through which to view the sociopolitical nature of the present. Challenging the tradition of documentary/ethnography as objective, woods creates ethno-fictive documents that investigate invisible dynamics in society, remixing memory and imagining other possibilities. She also explores how traditional monument-making can be translated into new contemporary models of commemoration, substituting the traditional marble and granite for new media. In 2013, woods unveiled Drinking Fountain #1, a new media monument to the American Civil Rights Movement, past and present activists/organizers, and the spirit of resistance, installed underneath the remnants of a recently rediscovered Jim Crow “White only” sign in the Dallas County Records Building. Part sculpture, part intervention, the piece is part of the larger public artwork A Dallas Drinking Fountain Project. Having shown internationally throughout her career, woods’s most recent solo exhibition at Zhulong Gallery in Dallas continued her exploration of subject and object through the lens of color with multichannel video and sound interventions that envelope the viewer.

For this Tuesday Evenings presentation, lauren woods shares the work and ideas that have formed her practice.

A video recording of this lectures will be available on the Modern's Youtube

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on special exhibitions, with artists, curators, art historians, and writers holding conversations in the galleries. This special program is free and begins at 1 pm on the first Sunday of selected months.

Valerie Hegarty is a Brooklyn-based artist who creates paintings, sculptures, and installations that often address themes of memory, place, and history. Her site-specific 2012 exhibition Alternative Histories, in which Hegarty “activated” the period rooms at the Brooklyn Museum, exemplifies her work. In an article on the show by Benjamin Sutton for Blouin Artinfo, the artist explained, “This is really setting a movie scene, the way you have to think about the framing in here, like framing a painting. I wanted it to be really painterly against all this formal stuff.” The exhibition’s curator, Eugenie Tsai, elaborated: “One of our great concerns is manifest destiny, so she’s referring to colonization, and the way that nature was destroyed through the building of towns, the settling of the land, and the displacement of indigenous people. And so in some ways she is showing revenge. I think it’s more a reference to nature displaced, and natural forces displaced.”

For Tuesday Evenings at the Modern, Valerie Hegarty shares her work and experiences in “Valerie Hegarty: Reverse Archeology, the Creation of Decay and Other Uncanny Transformations.”

Curator of Education, Terri Thornton's blog post following this lecture.
A video recording of this lectures will be available on the Modern's Youtube

Charles Gaines, a pioneer of conceptualism and a highly influential educator, is an established Los Angeles-based artist and longstanding professor at California Institute of the Arts. Celebrated for his photographs, drawings, and works on paper, Gaines investigates how rule-based procedures produce order and meaning. As described by the Hammer Museum in conjunction with the recent exhibition Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974–1989, the artist’s early groundbreaking work “serves as a critical bridge between the first generation conceptualists of the 1960s and 1970s and those artists of later generations exploring the limits of subjectivity and language.” Currently represented in the 56th International Art Exhibition of this year’s Venice Biennale by Librettos, a new series that brings together the score of the opera La Vida Breve by Spanish composer Manuel de Falla and a speech from 1964 by Black Panther Party member Stokely Carmichael, and Sound Text, a multipart series incorporating drawings on paper that lead to a performance by a seven-piece ensemble, Gaines continually produces ambitious and compelling work that is as challenging as it is inviting.

For this Tuesday Evenings lecture, artist Charles Gaines shares ideas that have informed his long and influential career.

Curator of Education, Terri Thornton's blog post following this lecture.
A video recording of this lectures will be available on the Modern's Youtube

Randy Brown, FAIA, is a recognized architect whose expertise falls into three types of projects: cultural, dwelling, and identity. Awarded sixteen AIA National Awards and regularly featured in major architecture journals and publications, the guiding principles and character of Randy Brown Architects are reflected in the firm’s inclusion in the 2012 publication by Damir Sinovcic, 50 US Architects: Residential + Planning, a curated collection of award-winning residential and master planning work from leading American designers whose meticulously detailed and site-specific projects focus on sustainability, technology, and the human spirit.

In conjunction with the 2015 Fort Worth AIA Design Awards, Brown presents the ideas and work of Randy Brown Architects, based in Omaha, Nebraska, and known for an approach to architecture that meshes modern design with an appreciation for the land and lifestyle of its region.

A video recording of this lectures will be available on the Modern's Youtube

Nicolas Bourriaud (b. 1965) is a French curator, writer, art critic, and author of theoretical essays on contemporary art.  Bourriaud was the Gulbenkian curator of contemporary art at Tate Britain, London, where he curated The Tate Triennial: Altermodern (2009). He co-founded and was co-director of the Palais de Tokyo, Paris, from 1999 to 2006. He founded the contemporary art magazine Documents sur l'art, of which he was director from 1992 to 2000, and worked as a Parisian correspondent for Flash Art from 1987 to 1995. His writings have been translated into over 15 languages, and his publications include Radicant (Sternberg Press/Merve Verlag, New York/Berlin, 2009), Postproduction (Lukas & Sternberg, New York, 2002, English edition, Les presses du reel, Dijon, 2004, French edition), Formes de vie. L’art moderne et l’invention de soi (Editions Denoël, Paris, 1999), and Relational Aesthetics(Les presses du réel, 1998, French edition, English edition, 2002).

Bourriaud will be giving a lecture at the Modern on his recent work, Politics of the Anthropocene. Humans, Things and Reification in Contemporary Art.

“The Public Object: On Sculpture and Thingness in Public Space”
What makes an object a sculpture? What makes a thing recognizable as art? How does the public realm shape these questions differently than the white cube?

Andria Hickey is Curator at the Public Art Fund, where she has curated exhibitions throughout New York City with artists such as Danh Vō, Katharina Grosse, and Oscar Tuazon, as well as the group exhibitions Lightness of Being (2013), Configurations (2012–13), and A Promise Is a Cloud (2011–12). Her current group exhibition, Image Objects, explores the nature of public art in the digital age and is on view at City Hall Park until November 20. Prior to working for the Public Art Fund, Hickey was curator at Art in General, a nonprofit gallery in Lower Manhattan, and from 2007 to 2010 she was curatorial fellow in the department of visual arts at the Walker Art Center. In addition to operating through institutions and organizations, Hickey established herself early on as an independent curator and writer in Montreal and Newfoundland. She continues to pursue her personal interests through various independent endeavors, such as her recent group exhibition Objects Food Rooms at Tanya Bonakdar Gallery in New York.

For Tuesday Evenings at the Modern, Andria Hickey expands upon her recent curatorial work to explore the shifting nature of the art object from the sanctioned art spaces of galleries and museums to the unyielding context of the public realm.

Curator of Education, Terri Thornton's blog post following this lecture.
A video recording of this lectures will be available on the Modern's Youtube

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s current exhibitions. Artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries. This special program is free and begins at 1 pm on the first Sunday of selected month

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