Posted by Terri on February 26, 2015 - 9:19am

Tuesday Evenings began in the fall of 1991 and grew out of an effort to make the Modern more available to its public and to include that public in a conversation about current art-related ideas and events within the Metroplex and beyond. I attended the lectures before working at the Modern, but developed a keen relationship with the program when I became Curator of Education in November 1994. Organizing Tuesday Evenings was one of many exciting challenges when I began the job, but it was also one of my favorites—and it still is.

Posted by Nathan on January 6, 2015 - 4:55pm

Posted by Tiffany on September 16, 2014 - 2:29pm

The new school year has begun and the busy days of Art Camp are over. Here are some highlights from the Modern’s summer programs:

Art Camp: Almost 5

Campers spend time studying the gestural marks of Stephen’s Iron Crown, 1981, by Robert Motherwell.

Posted by Terri on July 31, 2014 - 11:57am

Posted by Terri on March 20, 2014 - 11:50am

"I'll take you there."

—The Staples Singers

Posted by Cara on August 6, 2013 - 12:12pm
Categories: Mexico Inside Out

This week focuses on the artists Teresa Margolles and Artemio, included in the upcoming exhibition México Inside Out: Themes in Art Since 1990.

Posted by Cara on August 6, 2013 - 12:04pm
Categories: Mexico Inside Out

This week focuses on the artists known as Tercerunquinto and their upcoming piece in the exhibition México Inside Out: Themes in Art Since 1990 opening September 15.




Prepatory sketch for proposal

Courtesy of the artists and Proyectos Monclava


Posted by Chloe on July 23, 2013 - 3:11pm
Categories: Mexico Inside Out

Beginning September 15, the Modern will present México Inside Out: Themes in Art Since 1990. To prepare for the show’s opening, we’ll be posting weekly about the artists featured in the exhibition and the overarching themes that connect different works.  

This week features Melanie Smith and her video piece Aztec Stadium. Malleable Deed, 2010.

Posted by Terri on July 17, 2013 - 11:25am

“When an artist uses a conceptual form of art, it means that all the planning and decisions are made beforehand and the execution is a perfunctory affair. The idea becomes the machine that makes the art.”     

Sol LeWitt, “Paragraphs on Conceptual Art,” 1967


Posted by Tiffany on March 7, 2013 - 1:52pm
Categories: Within the Walls

The Modern is currently celebrating 10 years in our Tadao Ando building. In conjunction with this celebration, the Anniversary Class has been taking a closer look at the Modern’s collection, focusing on 10 works in 10 days. On the third day of class, artist Kris Pierce guided an in-depth examination of the newly aquired Jenny Holzer piece, Kind of Blue, 2012. Participants researched and selected their own “truisms” and experimented with compostions made only from text.

Posted by Erin on February 26, 2013 - 10:49am
Categories: On the Walls

Posted by Erin on February 14, 2013 - 3:17pm

Posted by Terri on December 4, 2012 - 9:38am
Categories: On the Walls

Light is integral to every visitor’s experience at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. The museum’s architect, Tadao Ando, essentially treats light as a material that is as necessary as the concrete of the walls, the steel supports, the granite floors, and the sheets of glass that connect the museum interior to the nature and city that surrounds it.

Posted by Erin on November 15, 2012 - 10:23am
Categories: On the Walls

The role of the written word in/as art is of abiding interest to me. Whether it be language as artmaking material (as is the case with Lawrence Weiner’s work), the wall drawings of Sol LeWitt (where the instructions for carrying out a piece are as crucial as the drawing itself), or the often dense and always rich writings of the British group Art & Language (their essays being best understood as art), recent art history is brimming with artists engaging with language in order to better elucidate a specific conceptual and aesthetic sensibility.

Posted by Nathan on November 8, 2012 - 9:45am
Categories: On the Walls

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, it is clear that the New York gallery world has suffered a colossal blow, with scores of galleries devastated, countless works of art destroyed, and heaps of historical material washed into the Hudson. It is impossible for these events not to prove the ultimately ethereal and fleeting nature of artworks. It is from this perspective that I started to rethink one of the Modern’s recent acquisitions that is currently on view, Sol LeWitt’s Wall Drawing #50 A, 1970.